Alcohol consumption and the risk of incident pulmonary embolism in US women and men
Author(s): ,
L. B. Harrington
Affiliations:
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA
Correspondence: Laura B. Harrington, Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Building 2, Room 302, Boston, MA, 02115, USA|Tel.: +1 617 432 1841|E‐mail: lharring@hsph.harvard.edu
,
K. A. Hagan
Affiliations:
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA
,
K. J. Mukamal
Affiliations:
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
,
J. H. Kang
Affiliations:
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
,
J. Kim
Affiliations:
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA
,
M. Crous‐Bou
Affiliations:
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA. Clinical Research Program, BarcelonaBeta Brain Research Center – Pasqual Maragall Foundation, Barcelona, Spain
,
S. Lindström
Affiliations:
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, USA
,
E. B. Rimm
Affiliations:
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA
,
C. Kabrhel
Affiliations:
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
M. K. Jensen
Affiliations:
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, USA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
ISTH Academy. B. Harrington L. Sep 4, 2018; 230975
Laura B. Harrington
Laura  B. Harrington

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Background
Moderate alcohol consumption has been variably associated with hemostatic and fibrinolytic factor levels, but the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of incident pulmonary embolism (PE) remains uncertain.
Objective
To evaluate alcohol consumption amount and frequency in relation to PE risk.
Methods
Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), NHS II and Health Professionals Follow‐Up Study participants free of venous thromboembolism (VTE) at baseline (n = 217 442) reported alcohol consumption by type, quantity and frequency, every 2–4 years. Incident PE cases were identified by self‐report and confirmed for participants without cancer. In this cohort study, we used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable‐adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for PE associated with alcohol consumption amount and, separately, frequency. Secondary analyses evaluated alcohol type and heavy episodic drinking in relation to PE risk, and amount and frequency in relation to medical record‐confirmed idiopathic PE and any self‐reported VTE risk. Cohort‐specific analyses were pooled using random‐effects meta‐analysis.
Results
During ≥ 20 years of follow‐up, we identified 1939 PE events. We found no strong evidence of an association between PE risk and alcohol consumption amount (pooled HR for 5.0–14.9 g day vs. abstention = 0.97 [95% CI, 0.79, 1.20]) or frequency (pooled HR for 5–7 drinking days per week vs. abstention = 1.04 [95% CI, 0.88, 1.23]). Secondary analyses of type, heavy episodic drinking, idiopathic PE and VTE also yielded null findings.
Conclusions
Among three large prospective cohorts of US men and women, we found no evidence of an association between the amount or frequency of alcohol consumption and PE risk.
Keyword(s)
diet, epidemiology, hemostasis, pulmonary embolism, venous thrombosis
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