Save
Clinical and economic impact of compression in the acute phase of deep vein thrombosis
Author(s): ,
E. E. Amin
Affiliations:
Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Correspondence: Elham E. Amin, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, the Netherlands|Tel.: +31 43 387 7539|E‐mail: e.amin@maastrichtuniversity.nl
,
M. A. Joore
Affiliations:
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
,
H. ten Cate
Affiliations:
Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
,
K. Meijer
Affiliations:
Department of Hematology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
,
L. W. Tick
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Maxima Medical Center Eindhoven, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
,
S. Middeldorp
Affiliations:
Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
,
G. J. M. Mostard
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Zuyderland Medical Center, Heerlen, the Netherlands
,
M. ten Wolde
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Flevoziekenhuis, Almere, the Netherlands
,
S. M. van den Heiligenberg
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Westfriesgasthuis, Hoorn, the Netherlands
,
S. van Wissen
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
,
M. H. W. van de Poel
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond, the Netherlands
,
S. Villalta
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, Cà Foncello University Hospital, Treviso, Italy
,
E. H. Serné
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
,
H.‐M. Otten
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, MC Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
,
E. H. Klappe
Affiliations:
Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
,
P. Prandoni
Affiliations:
Arianna Foundation on Anticoagulation, Bologna, Italy
A. J. ten Cate‐Hoek
Affiliations:
Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
ISTH Academy. E. Amin E. Aug 2, 2018; 227423
Elham E. Amin
Elham  E. Amin

Access to Premium content is currently a membership benefit.


Click here to join ISTH or renew your membership.

Journal Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)


Background
The effectiveness of compression therapy in the acute phase of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is not yet determined.
Objectives
To investigate the impact of compression therapy in the acute phase of DVT on determinants of the Villalta score, health‐related quality of life (HRQOL), and costs.
Patients/Methods
Eight hundred and sixty‐five patients with proximal DVT (substudy of the IDEAL DVT study) received, immediately after DVT diagnosis, either no compression, multilayer bandaging, or hosiery. In the acute phase and 3 months after diagnosis, HRQOL was determined by use of the EQ‐5D, SF6D, and VEINES‐QoL intrinsic method (VEINES‐QoL). At 3 months, signs and symptoms were assessed for the total and separate items of the Villalta score, and healthcare costs were calculated.
Results
The compression groups had lower overall objective Villalta scores than the no‐compression group (1.47 [standard deviation (SD) 1.570] and 1.59 [SD 1.64] versus 2.21 [SD 2.15]). The differences were mainly attributable to irreversible skin signs (induration, hyperpigmentation, and venectasia) and pain on calf compression. Subjective and total Villalta scores were similar across groups. Differences in HRQOL were only observed at 1 month; HRQOL was better for hosiery (EQ‐5D 0.86 [SD 0.18]; VEINES‐QoL 0.66 [SD 0.18]) than for multilayer compression bandaging (EQ‐5D 0.81 [SD 0.23; VEINES‐QoL 0.62 [SD 0.19]). Mean healthcare costs per patient were €417.08 (€354.10 to €489.30) for bandaging, €114.25 (€92.50 to €198.43) for hosiery, and €105.86 (€34.63 to €199.30) for no compression.
Conclusions
Initial compression reduces irreversible skin signs, edema, and pain on calf compression. Multilayer bandaging is slightly more effective than hosiery, but has substantially higher costs, without a gain in HRQOL. From a patient and economic perspective, compression hosiery would be preferred when initial compression is applied. Trial registration: IDEAL DVT study ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01429714.
Keyword(s)
costs, prevention, quality of life, signs and symptoms, venous thrombosis
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.



Google Analytics is used for user behavior tracking/reporting. Google Analytics works in parallel and independently from MLG’s features. Google Analytics relies on cookies and these cookies can be used by Google to track users across different platforms/services.


Save Settings