Circulating ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin‐associated genes and the incidence of venous thromboembolism in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study
Author(s): ,
Antonio P. Arenas de Larriva
Affiliations:
Lipid and Atherosclerosis Unit, IMIBIC/Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía/Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
Correspondence: Antonio P. Arenas de Larriva, Lipids and Atherosclerosis Unit, IMIBIC/Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía/Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spa
,
Alvaro Alonso
Affiliations:
Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, USA
,
Faye L. Norby
Affiliations:
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
,
Nicholas S. Roetker
Affiliations:
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
Aaron R. Folsom
Affiliations:
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
ISTH Academy. P. Arenas de Larriva A. May 1, 2019; 273610
Antonio P. Arenas de Larriva
Antonio  P. Arenas de Larriva
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

Access to Premium content is currently a membership benefit.

Click here to join ISTH or renew your membership.

You may also access ISTH content "anytime, anywhere" with the FREE ISTH Academy App for iOS and Android.
Journal Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)


Background
Ceruloplasmin (CP) is an acute‐phase reactant and a potential biomarker of atherothrombotic risk. We assessed the associations between CP, CP‐associated genetic variants and incident venous thomboembolism (VTE) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
Methods and results
In an observational study, 9933 men and women aged 53–75 years without prevalent VTE were included in 1996–1998 and followed through 2011. Circulating CP was measured in stored blood samples obtained in 1996–1998. Polymorphisms rs11708215 and rs13072552, which have been previously associated with CP concentrations, were measured in 8439 participants. VTEs were identified from hospital discharge codes and validated by physician review of medical records and imaging reports. Over a mean of 10.5 years of follow‐up, 376 cases of VTE were identified. The association between circulating CP, CP‐associated polymorphisms and the incidence of VTE was estimated. After adjustment for traditional risk factors and biomarkers, higher concentrations of circulating CP were associated with greater incident VTE rates (hazard ratio 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.12–2.95, comparing the 87.5–100th percentile with the bottom quartile). Both rs11708215 and rs13072552 were associated with CP concentrations but not with VTE risk.
Conclusions
Even though high CP concentrations were associated with an increased VTE risk, CP‐associated genetic variants were not associated with a higher risk of VTE. Our results suggest that circulating CP concentrations may not be causally related to the risk of incident VTE.
Keyword(s)
ceruloplasmin, oxidative stress, single‐nucleotide polymorphism, venous thromboembolism
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies